Archive for the ‘Masters Swimming’ Category

The (Re-) Education of a Competitive Swimmer
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on February 23rd, 2014

This is a guest post by TI Coach John Fitzpatrick, head coach of the Chicago Blue Dolphin swim instruction and fitness program. I’d been a swimmer since early childhood, but I don’t feel like I started to understand swimming until the fall of 2000 when someone recommended I read Total Immersion:? The Revolutionary Way to […]

Video: The BEAUTY of Effortless. The SKILL of Slow.
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on August 1st, 2013

The liveliest thread on the TI Discussion Forum at the moment is titled ‘a question about continuance.’?with, as of this morning, 59 posts, which have drawn over 1300 views. What’s curious about this thread is that the initial query was about how to swim faster, yet the bulk of discussion has centered on various forms […]

บาคาร่า สูตรGuest Post: Olympic Swimmer Finds “Magic” in TI Practice
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on June 10th, 2012

Anna Karin Lundin, an Olympic swimmer in 1988 and a Masters World Champion, is swimming better than she ever dreamed possible, with TI. But she’s even more excited about discovering the joys of mindful purposeful TI Practice.

Passionate Curiosity and Deep Practice
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on May 12th, 2011

Passionate Curiosity is an indispensable mindset for anyone wishing to improve their swimming. Deep Practice is how you convert Curiosity into Mastery.

บาคาร่า สูตร60th Birthday Practice
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on March 26th, 2011

A special practice for my 60th birthday in which every set presents an interesting problem that (i) takes keen attention to solve; (ii) is objectively measurable; and (iii) develops Skills That Win Races.*

Should we train more intensively in middle age?
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on January 29th, 2011

I’m pursuing a different kind of Athletic Mastery at age 60, a radical shift after 40 years. Partly to show that age is just a number. And partly because I can grow more neurons by leaving my comfort zone.