Posts Tagged ‘attentive repetition’

‘Rewire your Brain’ for Purposeful Attention
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on July 18th, 2011

Twenty years ago, when I began trying to change my stroke from Habitually Human to Mindfully Fishlike, it soon became clear I’d need to rewire my brain for Purposeful Attention first.

Swimming as a Lifelong Student
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on May 14th, 2011

Information Sources are best for learning Core Principles and forming guiding concepts. Direct Experience is best for converting concepts into effective action.

Open (or close) your eyes and see as never before.
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on April 12th, 2011

Few swimmers *really* pay attention. Opening – or closing – your eyes can can change everything.

A Practice Devoted to Creating “Smarter” Hands
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on March 22nd, 2011

How to spend 30 to 60 minutes focused solely on increasing awareness and sensitivity in your hands.

Life will never get better than this moment.
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on February 20th, 2011

Life will never get better than this moment, because this moment is the only one we have. Give it your full attention and appreciation.

Mindful Swimming Transforms the Brain
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on January 24th, 2011

Meditation produces deep and lasting changes to the brain. Moving Meditation is best at producing those changes. Mindful Swimming provides a highly organized way to practice Moving Meditation, improving Mens Sana in Corpore Sano.

Trust Your Instincts
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on January 19th, 2011

A goal of Mindful Swimming should be to experience the sensations it produces so strongly that you can describe them vividly.

บาคาร่า สูตรHow to enter the “Superlearning State”
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on December 3rd, 2010

In the ‘Superlearning’ state, you’re calm, keenly alert, non-judging, and resistant to distraction. Starting practice with simple Balance drills will put you in it.

Video: How Balance improves Breathing
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on November 24th, 2010

Balance practice is best done in short, intensely focused repeats — the same kind that are best for improving advanced skills like breathing.

Balance, Closed Eyes, and the “Monkey Mind”
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on November 20th, 2010

Closing your eyes can help you learn fine skills faster. It also helps transform swimming into a moving meditation.