Swim For Life- www.onew88.com /50c The Blog of Terry Laughlin Fri, 20 Nov 2015 15:09:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 The Blog of Terry Laughlin Total Immersion Swimming no Total Immersion Swimming woodburnti@gmail.com woodburnti@gmail.com (Total Immersion Swimming) Total Immersion Swimming The Blog of Terry Laughlin Swim For Life- www.onew88.com /50c/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/TI_iTunes_Cover.jpg /50c New Paltz, New York Corsica to Sardinia: A ‘Bucket List’ Swim- www.onew88.com /50c/archives/2755/ /50c/archives/2755/#comments Fri, 20 Nov 2015 03:49:26 +0000 /50c/?p=2755 On October 19 I swam from Corsica to Sardinia–covering 15.5 km (9.6 miles) in 4 hours 31 minutes–with Tommi Patilla and Lennart Larsson. This is the story of that swim. Some swim for exercise, others for a sense of accomplishment or to achieve personal bests. Since my 50s, I’ve swum mostly for the?sheer?pleasure of it. […]

The post Corsica to Sardinia: A ‘Bucket List’ Swim appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
On October 19 I swam from Corsica to Sardinia–covering 15.5 km (9.6 miles) in 4 hours 31 minutes–with Tommi Patilla and Lennart Larsson. This is the story of that swim.

L to R: Tommi, Terry, and Lennart. Rear: Corsica

L to R: Tommi, Terry, and Lennart. Rear: Corsica

Some swim for exercise, others for a sense of accomplishment or to achieve personal bests. Since my 50s, I’ve swum mostly for the?sheer?pleasure of it. If it’s not fun, why do it?

Exercise? That ‘happens.’ And meaningful goals are?never far from mind. But what I want most is to feel engaged in body, mind, spirit–that there’s?nothing I’d rather be doing ?and to leave the pool counting the hours until I can swim again.

Even in an aging 25-yard chlorine-scented box, I have literally magical moments virtually every time.?As good as that may sound, my?peak experience in swimming is?swimming with friends in a beautiful natural setting. ?It’s hard to surpass the Shawangunk ‘Sky Lakes’?where I swim as often as possible from early?May to?late October.

Minne Sunset

August 28, 2014 7:30 pm Lake Minnewaska Twilight with Catskill Mountain backdrop.

 

My most memorable?experiences ?of all happen during?swimming ‘treks’–swims that belong on any swimmer’s bucket list. During these, I ?explore a part of ‘Planet Water to which access is granted only to a ?few.

Think of these as a swimmer’s Mount Everest–one that puts you in far more exclusive company, at a fraction of the?expense . . . and?no?risk?of falling into a crevasse or being caught?in an avalanche. Such an experience is made far richer when shared with friends, such as Lennart and Tommi.

Lennart, 66, is chairman of Oppboga, a packaging company in Orebro, Sweden. He began swimming at age 57, after?running dozens of marathons–including an impressive?five sub-2:35. Lennart became?a TI swimmer early on and has?completed about 15 marathon swims in his?60s, including the challenging Gertrude Ederle Swim in NY, and–twice–the 22K?Vidostern in Sweden. Lennart’s greatest pleasure is informal, self-organized?swims with friends for fun.

Tommi, 47, began swimming at age 40. ?At?a TI Open Water Experience in St John USVI, Tommi fell in love with long open water swims. Because of the demands of his work as a?cardiothoracic surgeon, Tommi can train only four to five hours a week. Even so, he completed the 28.5-mile Manhattan Island Marathon June 28 of last year, placing 3rd of 23 swimmers and still feeling fresh after nine hours. In 2016, Tommi plans to tackle?Catalina Channel, swim from Mallorca to Menorca . . . and book a 2017 English Channel slot.

We swam?Gibraltar Strait in Oct. 2013, covering the 18K from Spain to Morocco in 5:11. We did the whole swim as a “school of humans” — in close formation and synchronizing our strokes,??as shown below. Read about?this amazing experience?in?Crossing Gibraltar Strait: A Journey to Joy.

Bottom to top: Tommi, Lennart and Terry--Gibraltar Strait Oct  11, 2013

From Top to Bottom: Terry, Lennart and Tommi–Gibraltar Strait Oct 11, 2013

That was so enjoyable that we?immediately began planning?our next aqua-trek. The following week, another close friend–English Channel luminary Nick Adams–swam Corsica to Sardinia with three friends. While Nick has tackled?extraordinary?challenges–a double Channel crossing and an attempt at a triple–this swim was more?of a lark.

Only a few had swum Corsica-Sardinia before; Nick and friends were the first to do it sans neoprene. To encourage others to follow in his strokes, Nick had prepared an entertaining and richly?detailed “Corsica to Sardinia No BS Guide.” ?With Nick having done the legwork, and another beautiful Mediterranean strait to cross, our choice?was easy.

Corsica is French and Sardinia part of Italy, making this a literally international swim. ?How often can you say you’ve swum not only from one land mass to another, but from one country to another? (Crossing Gibraltar we?swam from one continent to another–the top of the hierarchy . . . until?someone figures out interplanetary swimming.)ISAR_WIN_MAP_WW_14

The Strait of Bonifacio is?just 12km across at its narrowest point and unlike the English Channel and Gibraltar, currents are a non-factor. Pretty easy pickings when it comes to swimming between countries.

I booked a 3-bedroom flat in Santa Teresa di Gallura, a picturesque town with a beautiful bay for swimming . . . ?and a view of Corsica–shown?below–that makes?the idea?of swimming to it?almost irresistible. Joining Lennart, Tommi and me are?two new friends from Barcelona, who’d swum it–wearing?wetsuits–over the summer.

5 Guys with Corsica

Terry and Tommi L and 2nd L, Lennart 2nd R with our friends from Barcelona

We all flew into Cagliari. Oops. We’d missed Nick’s recommendation to fly?into Olbia–just an hour from Santa Teresa. Cagliari was?a?5-hour drive. ?Plus Lennart’s luggage hadn’t arrived. ?So we took a swim and had a superb?Italian (what else?) dinner. Then back to the airport. Still no luggage. So we headed?north, arriving after midnight.

Festa

Lined up to begin . . . processing!

Friday?morning, after sleeping til 8, we made the short walk to Santa Teresa’s central piazza. There we were delighted?to?happen upon a procession with women?in folk garb, men in splendiferous uniforms, a marching band, a horse drawn cart with a holy?statue and a priest showering all with blessings. We’d ?arrived in Santa Teresa, fortuitously, just in time for the annual Festa.

The day turned overcast with a strong, chill wind churning?the sea into?whitecaps. Seeking calmer water, we drove to Porto Pozzo, a protected inlet shown below. We swam out-and-back from the small marina at center left to the mouth of the sea?at upper left. Unlike the day pictured, there was little water traffic. The water was a bit cool at 18C/64F, but comfortable so long as we kept moving.?portopozzo

I tried several times to call?Tomasso, our swim organizer and guide?but had?incorrectly entered his phone number into my iPhone, mistaking the city code for Italy’s country code. We walked around town looking for his dive shop, but no luck. He?emailed me late in the day–nervous?at not having heard from us. ?We made plans?to meet at his curio shop (he also owns a restaurant and a?dive shop) at 10 the next morning.

Our meeting on Saturday morning was leisurely and covered only basic details of the swim: Meet on the dock the next morning?at 7. Cruise to Corsica. Swim back. Free for?the rest of the day, we donned our suits and headed for the bay. ?Instantly, we regretted not having contacted Tomasso earlier–and thus having the option of swimming Saturday.

Conditions were perfetto; Warm sun, mirror-flat water (shown in the ‘5 Guys’ photo) and a light-but-favorable?breeze. The next best thing was simply to enjoy. We swam about 50 minutes in glorious conditions, synchronizing every stroke. Then an alfresco lunch at a beachside restaurant . . . why we love swim excursions.

We’d checked weather and wind forecasts several times a day?since arriving. After several days of winds strong?enough to noisily rattle?the shutters at our flat, Saturday?was the first calm day–going back to before we arrived. We hoped we wouldn’t regret?‘wasting’ it.

We awoke around 5:30 on Sunday to the sound of rattling shutters. Tomasso called us at 6:45 confirming what we already knew. The swim was off until at least Monday. Tommi and Lennart took the car and explored a bit. Just five minutes from Santa Teresa, they found this spot.?tumblr_nruyu017Vy1s1jq03o1_1280

That’s Capo Testa at the end of the isthmus. In the bay on the right, a strong wind was pushing up whitecaps and rolling?swells. Just steps away, in the bay on the left, the water was calm with a breeze gently ruffling the surface. ?The water was as inviting as it looks. For 50 fantastic minutes, we?cruised back and forth in synch. Tommi and I finished by ‘racing’ 200 meters–still in synch. We felt ready. Now all we needed was a good day. ?We only had Monday and part of Tuesday. Fingers crossed.

Monday dawned calm with patchy sunshine. It was our day. Around 7:30 am we left the dock on?Tomasso’s boat for Corsica.

On board and ready to swim

Leaving the harbor on our way to Corsica.

 

Our crew included Tomasso at the helm, Domenico, a local MD who came along as?medical officer, and my wife, TI Coach Alice Laughlin, to take?video and photos. ?All three prepared our hydration and feeds. As this would be a relatively brief swim–we anticipated?between 4 and 5 hours–I brought only water, a banana?and a few packs of energy gel.

L to R: Medical Officer Domenico, Captain Tomasso, First Mate Alice

We?left?the boat?and swam to shore. Once on the beach, we?stood clear of the tide line–the customary way to start a marathon–waved a hand, and began. By plan, we’d swim for an hour prior to our first feed, then feed at 30-minute intervals.

As I often do, I felt ambivalent in the early going: Do I really want to do this? Am I ready? Will some unexpected impediment arise? ? After we finished, Tommi said his thoughts at that point had mirrored mine.

I banished distracting thoughts with the reliable cure of focus–trying to make every?stroke the best it could be. Synchronizing?with Tommi and Lennart took more focus than usual too.

We’d synchronized with little difficulty?during our Gibraltar swim. But during our practice swims the previous three days, it was evident that Tommi had gotten faster, while Lennart had lost some speed. ?However,?Lennart?swam straighter which evened things out.

Tommi, while the fastest among us, was also more subject?to chilling. Slowing his pace would make that more likely. Tommi solved it by periodically veering to the east, then tacking back toward us, covering more distance?at a brisker pace. ?Sometimes I went with Tommi; sometimes I stayed with Lennart.

One of my concerns was real though. In September, I’d been forced to drop out of?a 10K at Coney Island after two hours and 6K of swimming, because I couldn’t pee. I was fine?the first hour, but during the second?hour, no matter how hard I tried, nothing came forth–even when I stopped for?water?at 5K. Once I got out, the bottleneck cleared. It might have been the?water temperature–about 65F–but I’d swum much longer in colder water many times before (including Gibraltar) without a hitch.

My worries were confirmed about 40 minutes in. Consequently I refused?water at the 1-hour mark and again 30 minutes later. I made up my mind to just swim from feed to feed, as long as I could, and hope the problem would resolve somehow.??And as is?nearly always true, the feed stops came with surprising speed. Often it seemed as if we’d only been swimming for 15 minutes when they beckoned?us to the boat.

But my discomfort increased steadily. At the 2-hour mark I conceded that?I couldn’t?swim any longer this way. I exited the water and thought my swim was done. Indeed by the rules of marathon swimming, even touching the boat is grounds for disqualification.

Happily after a couple of minutes on the boat I–well there’s no delicate way to put this–I peed copiously and felt complete?relief. For a moment I wondered if it was kosher to?resume swimming. “Why not?” I thought. “You came here to swim Corsica to Sardinia. Now do it.”

I jumped back in. Lennart and Tommi were 60 meters ahead, but within a few minutes I’d caught them. I repeated this two more times, at 1-hour intervals.

The only time we?looked to see how far we’d swum or how much remained, was during our feeds. But with each stop, our steady progress toward our destination was evident and we had a growing sense of excitement as the 3-hour mark passed. “Just two more feeds,” we said.??Counting down feeds is a common way for marathoners to mark progress toward the finish line.

At our 4-hour feed, Tomasso asked where we preferred t finish–at the nearest landfall, a rock face a short distance away, or swim a mile farther to?finish on the beach below Santa Teresa. It was an easy call: We’d finish on the beach.

In the final?kilometer, Tommi and I picked up the?pace, replicating the ‘races’ we’d had at the end of our practice swims–yet staying closely synchronized as we did. A?short distance from?the beach we pulled up, so we could finish all together. Below see the final minute or so before we stopped.

And listen to the conversation, around the 1:00 mark where Tommi says “So fun.” Eloquently said, Tommi.??If it’s not fun,?why do it?

 

Mission Accomplished: Back at the dock, we toast our swim.

Mission Accomplished. Back at the dock, we toast our swim. What waters beckon next?

When we reached the beach, Tommi and Lennart checked their gps watches: We’d swum 15.5K in 4:31, including our feed stops. A bit short of the unofficial record set by Nick Adams and friends of 4:22.

One thing that surprised me was how good?I felt over the final mile. On a swim that long, I should have drunk?at least 1.5 liters of water. But, fearful of ‘pee backup,’??I took only a couple of quick swigs of water, 4 to?6 oz. total. I never felt the need for an energy gel, but I ate a banana, in small bites over several stops. Still,?I felt fresh and fast at the end. Swimming in synch with Tommi, I felt like the Energizer Bunny-fish.

Before leaving Sardinia we discussed options for our next swimming trek. Croatia, Mallorca, the Atlantic coast of Morocco, and Arizona’s Lake Powell ?are all options

And the Corsica-to-Sardinia record of 4:22 is just waiting for someone to better it. Whether to break a record or simply to have as brilliant an overall experience as we did, if you’d like to swim?the Strait of Bonifacio–before crowds of swimmers discover and descend upon it–Nick has kindly agree to let us share his No BS Guide with you. Download บาคาร่า สูตรhere.

To prepare for doing so, you might consider attending a TI Open Water event, as Lennart and Tommi did. Upcoming events include:

  • January 3-8, 2016 – Open Water Experience – St. John, U.S.V.I. -?details?
  • January 31- February 5 , 2016 – All Women’s Open Water Experience – St. John, U.S.V.I. -?details
  • ?February 25-29, 2016 – Triathlon Swim Camp (pool and open water) – Clermont, FL –?details
  • March 7-12, 2016 – Open Water Experience – Kona, HI –?details

 

 

 

The post Corsica to Sardinia: A ‘Bucket List’ Swim appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
/50c/archives/2755/feed/ 9
“Guaranteed” Speed: Swim Faster the Smart Way- www.onew88.com /50c/archives/2744/ /50c/archives/2744/#comments Fri, 30 Oct 2015 22:15:35 +0000 /50c/?p=2744 In a few weeks, I’ll mark the 50th anniversary of when I first got serious about swimming—i.e. training with an explicit goal of swimming fast. In November of 1965, I joined the newly-launched swim team at my high school, St. Mary’s in Manhasset NY. For the next five or six years, I got faster each […]

The post “Guaranteed” Speed: Swim Faster the Smart Way appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
In a few weeks, I’ll mark the 50th anniversary of when I first got serious about swimming—i.e. training with an explicit goal of swimming fast. In November of 1965, I joined the newly-launched swim team at my high school, St. Mary’s in Manhasset NY.

For the next five or six years, I got faster each year simply because?growing taller and stronger as I matured mattered more than the inefficiency of my stroke or generic nature of my training. But at age 20 I plateaued. Though I was still maturing, I was already stroking as fast and working as hard as I could. In the 45 years since, speed has never again simply ‘happened.’

However, while I’ll celebrate my 65th birthday in just a few months, I’m still highly motivated to swim as fast as my physical capabilities, and limited training time, allow. Thus it’s thrilling to have mastered a form of training that offers a mathematically precise—you could even say?guaranteed—way of improving my speed.? The accompanying video illustrates how it works.?

ARVE Error: no id set

The first clip shows me swimming a continuous 100 yards. The onscreen graphics display the key elements in the Math of Speed, based on the formula Velocity = Stroke Length x Stroke Rate. However I’m far less interested in sprinting a short distance?, than in sustaining a brisk pace for a mile or more. That requires easy—and smart—speed.

I began?this 100-yard swim with?two thoughts:

  1. Stroke Count: I planned to?take 13 strokes on the first length, 14 strokes on the middle?two lengths, and 15 on the fourth length. (My Green Zone in a 25-yard pool is 13 to 16 SPL.) I missed my target count by one stroke on the third length, taking 15 strokes.
  2. Stroke Pressure: I planned to apply featherlight pressure (one TI Coach called this ‘gathering moonbeams’)?on the first length,?slightly firmer pressure on the middle lengths; and super-firm pressure on the final length.

I expected that increasing stroke count and stroke pressure would produce faster paces. And as I increased?tempo, pressure, and speed, I focused on keeping my stroke quiet and splash-free—as I always do when increasing pace.

From the video, I took split times, counted strokes, and timed tempo for each length. The seconds, stroke count, and Tempo for each length are displayed on screen:

1st 25: ? 21.7 sec., 13 strokes, 1.24 sec/stroke

2nd 25:? 21.7 sec., 14 strokes, 1.20 sec/stroke

3rd 25: ? 21.6 sec., 15 strokes, 1.16 sec/stroke

4th 25: ? 20.2 sec., 15 strokes, 1.06 sec/stroke

My 1500-meter pool pace (calculated by multiplying 25-yard split times by 66) improved from 23:52 on the first length to 22:12 on the final length.

Besides the technique?skills of balance, stability, streamline, etc., this swim also displays a high level of pacing skill, which is critical to racing success at any distance from 100 meters up—and to maximizing your personal speed potential.

Few swimmers can maintain or increase pace on each successive 25 of a continuous 100, as I did here. Fewer still can increase pace by 6.5% from start to finish. And here’s another thing to consider while watching this video. Drag increases exponentially as speed increases. Swimming?6.5% faster?should increase drag by?47%. Does I look?as if I’m working 47% harder on the 4th length?

The ability to generate easy speed requires two kinds of skills:

1. To keep one’s stroke efficient, relaxed, and highly integrated as?tempo and speed increase.

2. The ability to precisely control and adjust stroke length, tempo, and pressure.

To develop these skills you must design most training sets as?challenging tasks or problem-solving exercises like?the one illustrated in the next two video clips, shot in a 25-meter pool. Those shown are the first and last in a series of 7 x 25.

I started at a tempo of 1.10 seconds/stroke, and increased tempo by .04 on each successive 25 (1.06, 1.02, 0.98, 0.94, 0.90.) My goal was to test whether I could maintain a consistent stroke count—i.e. travel as far on each stroke—on each 25, to a cumulative tempo increase of two-tenths of a second. ?At a tempo of 1.1 seconds, 17 SPL converts mathematically to a 25-meter pace of 22.4 sec 0r 22:24 for 1500m. At a?tempo of .9, 17?SPL converts mathematically to a 25-meter pace of 18.8 sec or 18:00 for 1500 meters. That’s what I mean by ‘guaranteed’ speed.

When I first began using a Tempo Trainer, I adjusted in smaller increments—as little as .01 second—and was pleased if I could hold one stroke count while increasing by .06 of a second. Years of practice have significantly improved my ability to hold Stroke Length, while increasing Stroke Rate. As I noted in the post Swim like Katie Ledecky, 40 years of data collected by USA Swimming has revealed that this is the closest thing to an algorithm for swimming success.

As also noted in that post, training for Smart and Easy Speed starts with two steps

1. Learn to swim consistently in your Green Zone range of stroke counts.

2. Patiently learn to swim each of those stroke counts at incrementally faster tempos.

To test your own level of Smart Speed Skills, download the Green Zone chart and order a Tempo Trainer.

Happy? laps.

The post “Guaranteed” Speed: Swim Faster the Smart Way appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
/50c/archives/2744/feed/ 10
Using the Math of Speed to Achieve A ‘Dream Swim’- www.onew88.com /50c/archives/2735/ /50c/archives/2735/#comments Mon, 12 Oct 2015 19:37:56 +0000 /50c/?p=2735 This post provides?a ‘real life’ example of?how one swimmer can improve her speed–and achieve a dream–by using the TI Principles-based approach I’ve described in several recent posts. This month?I’ll spend a ‘fortnight’ in the UK leading workshops and training coaches. While there I’ll also spend a couple of hours with Helen Webster, editor of 220, […]

The post บาคาร่า สูตรUsing the Math of Speed to Achieve A ‘Dream Swim’ appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
This post provides?a ‘real life’ example of?how one swimmer can improve her speed–and achieve a dream–by using the TI Principles-based approach I’ve described in several recent posts.

This month?I’ll spend a ‘fortnight’ in the UK leading workshops and training coaches. While there I’ll also spend a couple of hours with Helen Webster, editor of 220, the UK triathlon magazine, introducing?her to the TI Method?in TI Coach Tracey Baumann’s Endless Pool.

A happy Helen après swim

A happy Helen après swim

I queried Helen on her swimming history and perceived needs or priorities to ensure we would focus on her priorities. Here are her responses:

I hadn’t swum before coming to work at 220 magazine two years ago, so I’m a complete newbie! I’ve had a few lessons so I can swim front crawl now and have completed around 10 triathlons, swimming up to 1500m in open water. I’m keen to get all the advice and help I can. I may be slow, but I’ve really fallen in love with swimming and have lots of enthusiasm!

?My endurance is pretty good, but I’ve hit a plateau. I swim 2k in about 55mins, but can’t seem to get faster. I swim 4x a week for an hour but don’t have a structured plan and thus I mainly just do lengths.

?I’ve gotten feedback from coaches of?areas I need to focus on, but I struggle to prioritise them. Besides swimming faster, being able to complete a 5km swim in the Lake District next summer, in a reasonable time, is the dream!

Helen also included a link to a video shot by Gabriel Lombriser?at a training camp several days earlier.

http://1drv.ms/1gIN3GN

I replied

I’m delighted that you’ve fallen in love with swimming. I’ll do my best to deepen those feelings. Your video provided invaluable information and insight—both on your form, and on the ‘math’ of the speed at which you’ve plateaued. By ‘math” I mean that your pace is the exact product of how far you travel on each stroke (Stroke Length) and how frequently you take them (Stroke Rate).

Though?the video didn’t show complete lengths, I estimate you took about 36 strokes per?25 meters. I timed 10 strokes at two points to learn your Stroke Rate, which was .83 sec/stroke both times. [For sake of comparison, my tempo while racing 1500 meters in open water is about 10 percent slower–between .95 and 1.0 sec/stroke–but I’ve worked many years to acquire the skill to keep my stroke efficient at that rate.]

I see you use a kind of ‘windmill’ action. Look for this in the video: Your arm is at full extension when it first appears beneath the surface and immediately begins pushing back. There?is no lengthening component in your stroke. This is highly typical of new swimmers.

How long should your stroke be? Our Green Zone chart gives a height-indexed range of efficient counts for 25 meters.

In TI technique, your arm’s most important role is to lengthen your bodyline . . . and to ‘separate’ the molecules in front of you–the function performed by the sharply tapered nose of an F-15 fighter jet, bullet train or barracuda. Both help in significantly reducing drag.

Like all human swimmers, your upside on reducing drag is almost limitless, while that on increasing propulsion is quite finite.

Thus we’ll focus on significantly increasing your stroke efficiency by adding a lengthening-and-separating phase. We’ll start with Balance, the ‘non-negotiable’ pre-requisite to a long—and far more relaxed–stroke.

Helen replied

I counted strokes this morning in a 25m pool and you’re right; I range from 33 to 36 SPL. According to your Green Zone chart, at my height of 67 inches, I should be taking 17 to 21 strokes. Quite a difference!

?I’ve heard before that I swim with a ‘windmill’ stroke but haven’t had a clue about how to fix this. Even when I understand I’m doing something wrong, trying to make my arms do something different often seems pretty near impossible!

I wrote back

I’m glad this makes sense. Here’s how an increase in stroke efficiency will enable you to improve speed almost effortlessly. We’ll apply the Math of Speed formula (Velocity = Stroke Length x Stroke Rate or V = SL x SR) to what the video reveals about your swimming.

Allowing 3 to 4 seconds for the pushoff, your pace at 33 strokes and .83 tempo should be about 31 seconds. (.83 seconds/stroke x 33 strokes/length = 27.4 seconds per length [swimming] + 3.5 seconds [pushoff] per length = 31 total seconds per length.)

If you continued beyond 25m, within a length or two–feeling fatigued from your high stroke rate—you probably slow your stroke a bit, but your SPL has increased to 36. This mathematically produces a pace of 37 to 38 sec per 25—or approximately?2:30 per 100m. Is this reasonably close to your actual training paces? [After receiving this message, Helen timed herself for 100m repeats and found she does indeed start at 2:30, then slows to about 2:38 per 100.]

If you bring your stroke count into your Green Zone by improving the TI ‘foundation’ skills of Balance, Core Stability and Streamline, here’s how the math changes. Suppose our initial goal is for you to be able to swim a pace of 2:00/100m (30 sec/25m) with such ease that you can maintain it indefinitely.

Calculating as above tells us that at 21 SPL—the highest count in your Green Zone–you need only stroke at a tempo of 1.24 sec/stroke. At this strikingly more relaxed tempo, you’re likely to feel far more ease . . . and consequently, maintain that pace almost indefinitely without fatigue. Improving by 25 seconds per 100m would project to an improvement of about 8:00 in your current 2K time—from 55 to 47 minutes. And with further practice I would expect two changes in your swimming.

  1. You should lower your average SPL?at a 1.24 tempo. A 1-stroke improvement (to 20 SPL) would carve an additional 4 seconds/100 or 1 minute 20 seconds for 2K from your pace.
  2. OR being able to hold 21 SPL at, say, 1.14 tempo (a tenth of a second per stroke faster) would result in the same pace improvement. In practice, it will probably be a little of each.

Step One is to?develop a strong?efficiency foundation that 10 to 20 hours?of practice should bring you to comfortably and consistently swimming at 20 to 21 SPL. A few months of ‘encoding’ new skills over the winter should put you in a place to swim sub-50 minutes for 2K . . . and confidently undertake your ‘dream swim’ of 5K in the Lake District.

 

The post Using the Math of Speed to Achieve A ‘Dream Swim’ appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
/50c/archives/2735/feed/ 0
Video Interview: World Triathlon Champion Kirsten Sass and her coach Suzanne Atkinson. Both are TI Coaches!- www.onew88.com /50c/archives/2729/ /50c/archives/2729/#comments Thu, 01 Oct 2015 15:49:18 +0000 /50c/?p=2729 On Sept 19, TI Master Coach Suzanne Atkinson posted on Facebook that one of her athletes had just won a triathlon world championship. That would be exciting news in any case, but what made this feat particularly special was that the athlete was another TI Coach! Kirsten Sass was Women’s Overall Age Group Champion in […]

The post บาคาร่า สูตรVideo Interview: World Triathlon Champion Kirsten Sass and her coach Suzanne Atkinson. Both are TI Coaches! appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
On Sept 19, TI Master Coach Suzanne Atkinson posted on Facebook that one of her athletes had just won a triathlon world championship. That would be exciting news in any case, but what made this feat particularly special was that the athlete was another TI Coach!

Kirsten Sass was Women’s Overall Age Group Champion in the Olympic Distance World Triathlon Championships.

I couldn’t wait to learn more so I asked Suzanne and Kirsten to join me for a Google hangout. We recorded it to share with you. Though I’ve had the pleasure of spending much time working and swimming with them, I learned some quite surprising things.

A small sample (at the 5:00 mark): In her first triathlon, in 1999,?Kirsten placed “dead last in my age group.”

I’ve heard stories of people who ‘made the podium’ in their first tri, discovered potential they hadn’t suspected, and went on to highly successful triathlon careers. But I’d never heard of someone going from last place to a?World Championship.

Kirsten’s?reaction to finishing last? “Surely I can go faster than that.” ?Also,?she says, she thoroughly enjoyed the experience, regardless of place, because everyone who passed her was encouraging and supportive.

And here’s something else of interest. We’ve noticed that Total Immersion seems to exert a pronounced attraction to people in the health-care field. Suzanne and Kirsten both?coach as an avocation. In their??‘day jobs,’ both are?health-care professionals.?Suzanne is an MD with a long-time specialty in emergency medicine. She also teaches?University of Pittsburgh Medical School . . . yet one more form of coaching.

Kirsten is a physician’s assistant, as well as a mom to two young children.

If you’d like to meet Kirsten and Suzanne in person, both will join me as?coaches at the TI Triathlon Swimming Camp?Feb 25-29, 2016 in Clermont Florida.

 

 

The post Video Interview: World Triathlon Champion Kirsten Sass and her coach Suzanne Atkinson. Both are TI Coaches! appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
/50c/archives/2729/feed/ 1
How I Used Principles-Based Training to Swim Faster in Spring and Summer- www.onew88.com /50c/archives/2724/ /50c/archives/2724/#comments Mon, 28 Sep 2015 18:09:30 +0000 /50c/?p=2724 This is the third post in a series describing how to swim faster with a principles-based approach. In this post I share the thought process that guides my own training. Speed isn’t my highest priority, but I frequently use it to measure the effectiveness of my efforts. Five Core Truths of Speed To follow a […]

The post How I Used Principles-Based Training to Swim Faster in Spring and Summer appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
This is the third post in a series describing how to swim faster with a principles-based approach. In this post I share the thought process that guides my own training. Speed isn’t my highest priority, but I frequently use it to measure the effectiveness of my efforts.

Five Core Truths of Speed

To follow a principles-based approach, you drill down to identify core truths about something, then use them to guide your actions. Here are five core truths about speed in swimming that guide the TI Method:

  1. Speed is a math problem captured in the equation Velocity = Stroke Length x Stroke Rate or V = SL x SR. [Measure Length and Rate in training via Strokes Per Length (SPL) and Tempo.]
  2. Because Stroke Length is the factor in that equation with the strongest proven correlation with speed, it should be your starting point. [Use the TI Green Zone chart to determine how many strokes per length (SPL) is efficient for your height. Download for free here.]
  3. Achieving your most efficient SPL–most swimmers take too many strokes–requires considerable skill . . . primarily the skill of minimizing drag. [Learn these skills with the downloadable TI Self-Coaching Toolkit.]toolkit.jpg
  4. For a simple and foolproof way to swim faster, incrementally increase Tempo, while keeping SPL constant. [Doing this with a Tempo Trainer is the most precise way to do so.]TT Pro
  5. Because drag increases exponentially with gains in speed (2x faster = 4x drag), streamlining skill becomes increasingly important as you swim faster.

In the first post in this series, Can You Swim Faster . . . Easier? I explained why initial efforts to increase speed should focus on learning to swim your current pace with less effort. Reduce energy waste and drag; minimize wavemaking and turbulence; control stroke count and pace.

In the second post Want to swim like Katie Ledecky? You can! I showed that learnable skills were critical to the most dominant distance freestyle performance in swimming history. To recap, Katie was the best in the field at:

  • Maintaining a highly efficient stroke count—at the lower end of her personal Green Zone, even at top speed.
  • Keeping SPL consistent at a wide range distances and speeds.
  • Increasing Stroke Rate/Tempo while maintaining a highly efficient SPL.

Terry’s Training Lab

My three highest priorities in swim training are:

  1. Mens sana in corpore sano—the ancient Latin phrase meaning ‘a healthy mind in a healthy body.’
  2. 2. To be energized, mentally and physically, for everything else I’d like to do that day.
  3. To use my training as a ‘laboratory’ to learn what works in swimming, in both technique and training.

I consistently accomplish all three with practices I refer to as ‘Terry’s Training Lab,’ a name inspired by Mike Bryant, an avid Ironman triathlete and improvement-minded swimmer, who refers to practice sessions as his Aqua Lab.

I’ll turn 65 in six months—and have been swimming for over 50 years—so personal best times are no longer a realistic goal. However I keep my passion for improvement high by doing an Improvement Project several times a year. (The inspiration for this also came from a TI enthusiast–Andy Miller, of Brighton, England, who posts on the TI Discussion Forum as “Andy in Norway.”)

Improvement Projects have these elements:

  1. A defined time frame. Mine have lasted from 30 days to 12 weeks. Shorter is generally better because it concentrates your focus. Your time frame can be measured in number of practices or practice hours, or a calendar period.
  2. A measurable goal. The goal comes from an initial test, or assessment, swim or set, including at least two of these three metrics—Time, SPL, or Tempo. You conclude the project by repeating this test swim—and sometimes repeat it at intervals during the project.
  3. An improvement plan. Use information from the test set to plan your practices. Each practice should focus on making tiny improvements on one or more metrics in your test swim, and/or from an earlier practice during the project.

Accountability This is an optional, but critical, element. Andy announced his project—to see how much he could improve his personal best for 400 meters time in 21 practices—on the Forum, and gave periodic progress reports. When you make your goal public—whether to one person, or potentially thousands, as on the TI Forum—you’ll pursue it with greater commitment.

I’ve logged each of my Improvement Projects on the Favorite Practices and Sets conference on the TI Forum. In each, I’ve improved on my initial test set by between 5 and 10 percent. Given my age, half-century-long swimming history, and the relatively minimal training volume during these projects, that is quite striking improvement.

My most important benefit is the galvanizing sense of mission I experience during a project. Each time I go to the pool or lake, I know the precise purpose and ‘success metrics’ of that practice. My consistency in meeting practice goals has created a sense of anticipation and excitement for each swim. That success and satisfaction has flowed from principles-based training, guided by the Core Truths of Speed listed above.

Here are summaries of my last two Improvement Projects.

Terry’s Spring Training Project?(click to read all posts)

I began on April 20 with a test set of 3 x 550 yards on interval of 10:00. I chose 3 x 550 because it adds up to 1650y, the equivalent of 1500m in a 25y pool. I’d just taken a 7-month training hiatus, my longest downtime in many years, and thought this would be a good way to prepare for open water races I expected to do beginning in June or July.

On April 20, I swam?as follows:

#1 Tempo 1.20 sec/stroke. ???Time 8:31

#2 Tempo 1.17 ???????????????????Time 8:27

#3 Tempo 1.15 ???????????????????Time 8:25

My cumulative ‘broken’ 1650y time was 25:23.

I chose somewhat ‘leisurely’ tempos because of my lengthy downtime. I estimated they’d allow me to avoid exceeding 16 SPL–the top count in my 25y Green Zone.

My guesstimate turned out to be quite accurate. I was able to easily hold 14 SPL at the start, but it took maximum focus and self-control to avoid exceeding 16 SPL at the end.

Over the next two months, I trained 3 times per week, for an average of just 2000 yards per session. You can review every practice here. Each was focused on making tiny but steady improvements in SPL and/or Tempo from the test set and previous practices.

On June 22, I concluded my Spring Training Lab by repeating my test set of 3 x 550y on 10:00. This practice was the first time I didn’t use a Tempo Trainer. Instead I used SPL as my controlling metric, starting at 14 SPL and finishing at 16 SPL, as on my baseline test two months earlier.

My ‘final exam’ results:

#1 14-15 SPL?? Time 8:04

#2 15-16 SPL?? Time 7:46

#3 ?16 SPL???????? Time 7:45 (I was fighting off foot cramps on this?550.)

My ‘broken’ 1650 time improved to 23:35. This was 7% faster than on April 20—a very significant payoff for rather modest training.

Terry’s Summer Training Project?(click to read all posts)

Three days later I began my summer project, which would combine practices in an outdoor 50m pool with open water swims in Lake Minnewaska. I chose a ‘broken’ 1500m baseline test—done as 5 x 300m on 6:00–to maintain consistency with my spring project. I chose the shorter repeats because I began this project with a well-tuned stroke and much better fitness and believed shorter training swims would allow more progress.

For my initial test set of 5 x 300, I decided to start at 40 SPL and allow my count to rise to 41 then 42 (my 50m Green Zone is 36 to 44 SPL) while also increasing stroke-pressure from ‘featherlight’ to ‘firm.’

My times that day were 5:06, 4:59, 4:56, 4:52, 4:52 for a cumulative broken 1500m time of 24:45. I calculated my average tempo on this set as 1.13 sec/stroke.

The two metrics of average SPL and total 1500m time allowed me to calculate the third key metric—Tempo—with a reasonable degree of accuracy. I would use these three metrics in planning my pool and open water practices.

Training in both pool and lake allowed me to be a bit more creative in my summer project than in the spring.?I planned to repeat the 5 x 300 every 10 to 14 days, with about six pool or lake practices in between. I know from experience, I can adjust to a faster range of tempo in open water than in the pool. So I planned to push my lake tempo—with a goal of being comfortable and efficient a week or two later in the pool at that same tempo. My goal was to see how much I could increase tempo, while staying close to my initial SPL

In mid-summer, I switched to doing the 5 x 300 with tempo, rather than SPL, as the primary?metric. I did this because the spread between my time on the first and last 300m repeats had been?too great. By increasing tempo by just .01 second on each repeat, I reasoned I should have a much closer spread—and thus a faster cumulative time for the broken 1500.

When I made that change, I still improved my time?on each 300, but I reduced the average spread between fastest and slowest from 14 seconds, to 7 seconds. The key to doing this is to control increase in SPL (loss in SL) as tempo increases. That required intense focus.

On Sept 6, I swam my final test set of 5 x 300 on 6:00. I started at 1.04 sec/stroke tempo and a time of 4:47 (five seconds faster than any 300 on my initial test) and finished at 0.98 tempo and a time of 4:39.

My cumulative 1500 time was 23:41, an improvement of 1:04 and 5 percent from 10 weeks earlier. During those 10 weeks I’d averaged only 2000 meters per practice.

By making precise adjustments, I increased average tempo from 1.13 to 1.00 sec/stroke, while adding only two strokes—from 41 to 43–to average SPL. I increased tempo by 13 percent, while limiting increase in SPL to 5 percent.

In other words, I improved my 1500-meter pace by over a minute by ‘solving’ speed as a math problem.

Summary

In both Improvement Projects, I used a principles-based approach as follows:

  1. Began with Stroke Length/SPL as my primary factor.
  2. Devoted every meter of practice to?a problem-solving exercises?in the?math of speed. Every meter was also 100% specific to my personal capacities on that day.
  3. Never gave a thought to conditioning, yet gained steadily in fitness. As my nervous system adapted to more ?difficult combinations of SPL and Tempo–and I swim faster as a result–my fitness gains were specific to my exact requirements?at that moment.
  4. These?brief periods of highly focused, utterly precise,?low-yardage?training period resulted in significant gains in speed.
  5. Every practice left me highly?energized, mentally and physically, for my other activities.
  6. I learned invaluable lessons about high-efficiency training which I’m sharing with you here.

If you browse the posts on these?Forum threads, you’ll find detailed notes on how?I planned and adjusted my approach, as well as replies to queries or comments from other Forum members.

The post How I Used Principles-Based Training to Swim Faster in Spring and Summer appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
/50c/archives/2724/feed/ 3
Want to swim like Katie Ledecky? You can!- www.onew88.com /50c/archives/2712/ /50c/archives/2712/#comments Tue, 08 Sep 2015 16:50:05 +0000 /50c/?p=2712 I began our series on swimming principles six weeks ago. Since then, each weekly post has described the advantages of ‘principles-based’ swimming. In the words of Elon Musk–founder of Paypal, Tesla, and SpaceX–the core idea of principles-based thinking is to “drill down to the foundations of a problem to view it in an entirely new […]

The post Want to swim like Katie Ledecky? You can! appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
I began our series on swimming principles six weeks ago. Since then, each weekly post has described the advantages of ‘principles-based’ swimming. In the words of Elon Musk–founder of Paypal, Tesla, and SpaceX–the core idea of principles-based thinking is to “drill down to the foundations of a problem to view it in an entirely new way” rather than rely on conventional wisdom or prevailing paradigms.

Principles-based thinking is particularly important in swimming because conventional wisdom is based on two deeply flawed ideas:

  1. The fundamental actions of swimming are pulling and kicking. It’s been proven that ‘vessel-shaping’ is both more valuable and more fundamental: You should learn it first and give it more attention in nearly all circumstances . . . And remain conscious that vessel-shaping runs counter to primal instincts and most influences we encounter.
  2. Working harder is the solution to nearly any swimming shortcoming. In fact, our most pressing challenge is massive energy waste. The smartest and most effective solutions focus on reducing mis-spent energy . . . which is not likely to occur to the average swimmer

This post and the last are in response to a question about swimming faster– the aspect of swimming for which a principles-based approach is most urgent. This question, posted in the comments section, succinctly summarized conventional wisdom about swimming faster:?If you want to go fast, be prepared to get tired. Let’s not suggest you can swim fast without breaking a sweat.

The conventional wisdom and our instincts instruct us to stroke faster to swim faster. Stroking faster makes you more tired (breaking a sweat), which leads to physical discomfort.?Thus the conventional way to train for speed is to:

  1. Stroke faster;
  2. Train more and harder to increase resistance to the inevitable fatigue;
  3. “Push through pain barriers” – coaches’ lingo for intestinal fortitude or trying to ignore pain.

In my last post, Can You Swim Faster . . . Easier? I detailed the many ways to swim faster through subtraction—reducing energy waste and drag; minimizing wavemaking and turbulence; eliminating erratic stroke counts (and pacing.)

This post delves into how to improve speed when you’ve extracted most of the subtractive/easier gains and begin practicing skills that, yes, increase the metabolic demand of your swimming—higher stroke rate, higher heart rate, increased oxygen consumption.

The key question is: Will your speed training focus on breaking a sweat? Or will you Drill down to the foundations of faster swimming; identify the critical skills; and patiently apply yourself to mastering them.

We can find no better lens through which to view this than Katie Ledecky’s history-making performance at the FINA World Championships in Kazan, Russia last month. She became the first swimmer ever to win the 200-, 400-, 800-, and 1,500-meter freestyles at a World Championship. She also set three world records, giving her 10 in the last two years.katie-ledecky-kazan-worlds-swimming_h

This prompted Outside magazine to call her “the best athlete in the world right now.” Human performance expert Dr. Michael Joyner of the Mayo Clinic, ranked Ledecky’s combination of unprecedented range (200 to 1500) and sustained record-breaking with “the most remarkable endurance performances ever.”

Ledecky unquestionably has a world-class aerobic engine, but it’s so difficult to measure oxygen consumption while swimming that we can only guess at how her fitness compares with that of her rivals. However Ledecky’s stroke efficiency is precisely measurable and was strikingly superior to that of any rival.

The good news for you is that–unlike her physiological capacities—it’s learnable. Here’s a summary of how Ledecky outswam her competition:

  1. She took significantly fewer strokes. In the 1500 meters, Ledecky took 38 strokes per 50-meter pool length, fewer than any other finalist, and seven strokes less than runnerup Jessica Ashwood. While height is a key factor in stroke length, if both were equally efficient, Ashwood, at 5’8” should take only one more stroke per length than Ledecky at 5’11”. (180cm).
  2. Her stroke count was stunningly consistent. In the 1500, she swam an unvarying 38 strokes per length (SPL) for 90 percent of the race. And she averaged 39 SPL in the 200 meters–just one stroke higher than in the 1500, though her pace per 100 was four seconds faster!
  3. Under pressure, she made her stroke longer! Ledecky faced a serious challenge in only one race, the 200 meters, not taking the lead until the final 50. As she pulled away for the win, Ledecky took two fewer strokes than on the previous length. In contrast, silver medalist Federica Pellegrini (also 5’11”) increased her stroke count from 42 to 45 and bronze medalist Missy Franklin (6’2”) increased from 40 to 43.

Here’s how to apply these insights to your own swimming.

Step One: Know your optimal count . . . then work toward it.

In the 1500, Ledecky traveled 65% of her height on each stroke. (When Sun Yang broke the men’s 1500 record in the 2012 Olympics, he traveled 70% of his 196 cm height on each stroke.) Our “Green Zone” charts (a free download from the TI Digital Store) show a height-indexed range of efficient counts for non-elite swimmers—it starts at just 50% of height. Compare your count with those in the chart.

If your SPL is above the range for your height, you’re diverting energy into moving the water, instead of moving yourself forward. To reduce SPL, try the following:

  • Minimize drag. Align head with spine. Job One for your arms is to extend your bodyline. (Also eliminate bubbles and splash.) Job One for your legs is to draft behind your torso. You can’t go wrong by kicking less.
  • Slow tempo. Using a Tempo Trainer, slow tempo until you can swim 25m repeats at or below the highest count in your range. Slow tempo by an additional .05 seconds and try 50m repeats. Practice in that tempo range until you can swim 25m repeats at the lowest count in your Green Zone and 100 to 200m repeats at or below the highest count.?TT Pro

Step Two: Increase SPL Consistency

Swim 4 x 50 + 3 x 100 + 2 x 150 + 1 x 200. Rest 10 to 30 seconds between repeats. Count strokes. Assess as follows:

  1. Did you stay within your Green Zone?
  2. Did you limit SPL increase to three strokes between the 4 x 50s and the 200? (E.G. 18 SPL on 50s and no length higher than 21)? If you fell short on these parameters, avoid fast-paced swimming until you can do both on most of your repeat sets. Mastering this will teach you steady pacing—and lead almost effortlessly to faster times.

Step Three: Increase Stroke Rate

When you have good command of the first two steps, begin working on holding stroke count while increasing tempo (with the aid of a Tempo Trainer) using a set like that below. This example assumes a 25-yard Green Zone range of 16 to 19 strokes.

Choose a tempo at which you can easily complete 25 yards in 16 strokes. Swim a series of 25’s, increasing tempo by .01 on each successive repeat. For how many repeats can you maintain 16 SPL? Four is good. Eight is great. Repeat this exercise at any count in your Green Zone.

At the higher counts, your tempo range should be faster. E.G. If you can hold 16 SPL between 1.30 and 1.24 seconds/stroke, you might be able to hold 17 SPL between 1.23 and 1.18 seconds/stroke.

These exercises will help improve the speed skills that made Katie Ledecky the best athlete in the world.

?* ? * ? *

In my next post I’ll summarize my Summer Training Lab (10 weeks of practices in a 50m pool and on a 400m course in Lake Minnewaska) and how I used principles-based training, working on the same skills that set Ledecky apart from her rivals.

I’ll also explain why I began every set with the intention of finding the easiest possible way to achieve my objective.

 

The post Want to swim like Katie Ledecky? You can! appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
/50c/archives/2712/feed/ 25
Swimming Principles: Can You Swim Faster . . . Easier?- www.onew88.com /50c/archives/2635/ /50c/archives/2635/#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 11:04:21 +0000 /50c/?p=2635 My recent series of posts on Swimming?Principles has resonated strongly with readers, drawing an unusually large number of?appreciative comments. However one response?expressed some?skepticism on a topic of interest to many readers: Must you swim hard to swim faster? ?Here is an excerpt from?that comment. (You may?read it in full by scrolling down to the 10th […]

The post Swimming Principles: Can You Swim Faster . . . Easier? appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
My recent series of posts on Swimming?Principles has resonated strongly with readers, drawing an unusually large number of?appreciative comments. However one response?expressed some?skepticism on a topic of interest to many readers: Must you swim hard to swim faster? ?Here is an excerpt from?that comment. (You may?read it in full by scrolling down to the 10th response here.)

I must first thank you for turning this swimmer from someone who the life guards worried would not reach the other end of a 25m pool to someone who swims a mile a day. . . . The elephant in the room is this: If you want to go fast, be prepared to get tired. Let’s not suggest you can swim fast without breaking a sweat.

Sincerely,

Fintan

The most succinct answer to Fintan’s question is that I believe?nothing?in the principles suggests that a swimmer can achieve his or her?true maximum performance potential?without some exertion. I’ll recapsulize them?here.

First Principles These describe the challenges and conditions we?land-adapted creatures face in trying to perform an aquatic skill:

#1 Our opportunity for increasing fitness is finite (especially as we age). But. as energy-wasting machines, our upside for saving energy is limitless. Ergo,?we should focus more?on that.

#2 Nearly everything we do to save energy (starting with making energy conservation a priority) is (i) counter-intuitive and (ii) goes against conventional wisdom. Consequently, we must replace ‘autopilot’ swimming with examined?choices about how to spend practice time.

#3 Though efficiency isn’t natural, it is learnable . . . as shown?by thousands of TI swimmers. We should strive to improve on it incrementally, but steadily (Kaizen!)

#4?A?sleek ‘vessel’ is more important than powerful propulsion. This principle–though widely?ignored by swimmers and coaches–is universally embraced by naval architects and those who study fish swimming.

#5 Every part of the stroke affects?every other part. Thus we should treat?technique as a holistic system.?Practice?integration. Avoid practice?that dis-integrates the stroke and/or body.

Core Principles These address behaviors and mindsets that flow naturally from the first set:

? Focus on improvement. Mileage and?heart rate are ingredients in training, but should not be your starting point in planning.

? Practice economy and sustainability. Explore what you can accomplish by doing less, before doing more. This follows naturally on #1 above.

? Never practice struggle.?Many have found this to be good advice for living, not just swimming. However, in swimming, struggle is a primal instinct and we must act consciously to avoid it.

? Swimming should make you feel good physically. As you swim. Following the swim. And?over the long term. What feels better almost always IS better. And your fastest swims ever should feel awesome!

? Swimming should make you feel?better about yourself. ?Otherwise, why do it?

As someone who has coached swimmers to national championships and records–and achieved both in middle age–I see no conflict between the principles above and the quest for speed. Indeed, I believe they form a powerful foundation for the most intelligent and effective way to train for speed.

Smarter Choices not Greater Efforts

There are two ways—one subtractive, one additive—to achieve faster times. The most-easily achieved improvements–those we should always pursue first–will be?subtractive. Reduce energy waste. Reduce drag. Eliminate erratic pacing, etc. Maximize the gains from this approach before pursuing the additive side–higher stroke rates, increased stroke pressure, etc. Among all the swimmers I’ve coached or observed in 40+ years of coaching, 99?Percent were in a position to?achieve highly satisfying outcomes via the subtractive approach. Succinctly put:?First explore doing less.

The additive side isn’t about heedlessly working harder: I.E. Don’t break a sweat . . . purely for the sake of perspiration. Instead treat speed as a math problem in which smarter choices will outperform greater efforts most of the time: Stroke Length X Stroke Rate = Velocity. I’ll address?this in my next post.

Swim Faster . . . Easier

This first-person account, which came in an I received via email from Des Johnston is a superb?example of the subtractive approach to swimming faster:

I was always?a typical lap swimmer–at least until last year. Like most of my fellow?lappers,?I considered?swimming as a form of exercise. Thus, I favored more and harder laps over attention to technique. ?But shoulder pain and a sense of stagnation and?dissatisfaction made me curious about?Total Immersion and its ‘fishlike’ technique.

Before TI,?I swam at a rate of 60 strokes per minute, yet my pace per 100m was only about?2:30. Because my balance and breathing were poor and I had a pronounced crossover in my stroke, I was working so hard for that slow pace, that breathlessness kept me from swimming more than?150 meters

Early this year, I began using TI self-coaching aids to relearn how to swim. ?I worked on balance with Superman,?streamlining with Skate, and core stability with a relaxed arm recovery. I discovered that relaxation?improved every part of the stroke. And the TI skill sequences led naturally to a relaxed-but-effective?2-Beat Kick.?

With a newly efficient stroke, I now swim 100 meters as fast as 1:40, and seldom slower than 1:50. And I travel so far on each stroke that I can swim those paces at a leisurely 40 strokes per minute. In other words,?though my stroke is a third slower, my swimming pace is a third?faster!?

The key has been relaxation! ?Let the water support your body (relaxed superman glides, skating). Relax your arms during recovery. Let your?lead hand float forward. Take your time and press lightly on the catch. ?Ease up on your kick. Sometimes I relax so much?that I catch myself swimming?with my eyes closed!

My swimming goals have changed as a result of?learning TI. I now prioritize?health, happiness, and enjoyment from my?swimming; faster paces simply ‘happen.’?

The Ageless Dr. Paul Lurie: Getting faster at 97.

Readers of this blog are familiar with Paul Lurie, a retired pediatric cardiologist. Paul taught at Albany Medical College from age 68 until 93, then retired from medicine and moved to Woodland Pond, a senior living center in New Paltz, where he took up choral singing, woodworking . . . and swimming. Paul began using TI self-coaching tools upon moving to Woodland Pond, developing a balanced and relaxed stroke on his own. He took four hours of lessons?with me at age 94. This video shows Paul ‘synch-swimming’ with me a year later, at age?95.

 

Following our lessons, Paul began swimming a daily 20-length practice of 2 lengths freestyle, 1 length backstroke in the 50-foot pool at Woodland Pond, checking his elapsed time periodically. The first time he checked it as 22 minutes-plus.

Like many nonagenarians, Paul has atrial fibrillation. His heart would race by the end of each length and he needed to rest until it slowed. Paul included the?rest breaks in timing his 20 lengths. But he continued to improve efficiency and relaxation and needed shorter rest breaks, so his cumulative time improved steadily.

By early 2014, at age 96, Paul’s time was in the 17-minute range. At this point, he asked me to teach him how to do an open turn?because he was sufficiently relaxed to swim two continuous laps before stopping to slow his HR.

When Paul timed himself in under 16 minutes, he thought?he’d miscounted so he asked fellow TI swimmer Marilyn Bell (first person to swim across Lake Ontario, in 1954 at age 16) to count his laps and time him. The result: 15:46. At that point, Paul said he was going to ‘retire” the record because he didn’t think it was healthy, at 96, to push himself to swim faster.

Marilyn, Paul, and Terry at Lake Minnewaska Aug 18, 2014

Marilyn, Paul, and Terry at Lake Minnewaska Aug 18, 2014

Last winter Marilyn contacted me to say that Paul’s record now stood at 14:06. This week she sent me the attached shot of her iPhone representing Paul’s new record of 12:15.–three and a half minutes faster than when he thought he shouldn’t try to swim any faster.

Paul new record

All that speed came not from working harder—which would be dangerous at his age. Rather because he has become more and more relaxed, keeping his heart rate lower, allowing to swim every farther with a low HR, and taking shorter breaks when he needs them.

Following his latest record, Paul sent me this message:

Good morning ,Terry, and a very good morning it is.

I planned this swim, deciding that I could do the whole thing very relaxed and thus cut down the need for seconds spent hyperventilating instead of swimming.

?Throughout the swim, I kept saying to myself “Rag Doll, Rag Doll, Rag Doll.” [The TI focal point for super-relaxed arms on recovery.]

?I thought I knew something about exercise physiology in the aging. The?improvement in my time?seems way out of the box to me.

Paul will be 98 in October. He has improved his 20-length time by 25 percent since age 96!

Minnebluffcloseup

In my next post, I’ll use Katie Ledecky’s amazing performances at the World Championships earlier this month to illustrate the ‘smart addition’ process for gaining speed.

The post Swimming Principles: Can You Swim Faster . . . Easier? appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
/50c/archives/2635/feed/ 20
The Truth about Five Common Swimming Myths- www.onew88.com /50c/archives/2665/ /50c/archives/2665/#comments Mon, 24 Aug 2015 16:42:18 +0000 /50c/?p=2665 The primary reason the average swimmer converts only 3 percent of energy into forward motion is that our swimming actions are so strongly influenced by basic self-preservation instincts. Concerns about choking and sinking are so primal that they continue to affect how we swim long after we’ve lost our conscious fear and even after we’ve […]

The post The Truth about Five Common Swimming Myths appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
The primary reason the average swimmer converts only 3 percent of energy into forward motion is that our swimming actions are so strongly influenced by basic self-preservation instincts. Concerns about choking and sinking are so primal that they continue to affect how we swim long after we’ve lost our conscious fear and even after we’ve become quite accomplished.

What else could explain why Sun Yang lifts and cranes his head, noticeably twisting?his body even while setting a 1500-meter world record.Sun Yang Breathing

Though this ungainly moment passes so quickly that you probably wouldn’t notice it on the surface, he repeated this several hundred times during his 1500m world record. How much time might it have cost him to distort his bodyline over and over?

Why does he still do that? It’s most likely this habit began to form when he was still a new swimmer, perhaps 6 years old. Eventually he hid it well enough that his coaches overlooked it. But if a world record holder can still waste energy in such an obvious way, how likely is it for the rest of us to avoid doing so?

My most recent post Most of What You ‘Know’ about Swimming is Wrong! explained how most of the advice we receive about swimming is likely to reinforce our existing wasteful instincts. We’re less likely to critically examine questionable advice when it agrees with what our own instincts already incline us toward.

The converse of this is: Actions that can significantly improve your swimming are most likely counterintuitive. As examples, consider five common myths and their non-instinctive counterpoints.

Myth: To swim fast, you must ride high on the water.

This myth arose because elite sprinters seem to have more of the body out of the water. In fact, hydroplaning occurs only at speeds of 30mph or greater, while no human has ever swum faster than 5mph. What we’re actually seeing is the swimmer cutting a deeper bow wave. This requires so much energy that it’s almost impossible to sustain for more than a minute.

Fact: On average, a human body, rides 95 below the surface. (How much of Sun Yang’s body is below the surface in the picture above ? As he swims 1500m faster than anyone in history!) We?swim through, not over, the water. Consequently drag avoidance, not power production, is our most important strategy for swimming faster.

Myth: Keep the water at your hairline. Partially due to influence from TI, this formerly universal notion is finally changing. Why did coaches teach this for so long? They said it would . . . help you ride higher on the water. In fact, the opposite is true.

Fact: The head represents about 8 percent of body mass. So if most of it is above the surface, other body parts must sink. This causes us to kick more, greatly increasing drag and energy waste. Because the head has many cavities, it is quite buoyant. Focus on feeling that your head rests on a ‘cushion’ of water and aligns with your spine —a universal principle of good biomechanics, demonstrated by Katie Ledecky at the World Championships in Kazan Russia.?katie-ledecky-kazan-worlds-swimming_h

Myth: Push water back (past your thigh . . . and/or faster in the last third of your stroke.) Various versions of this encourage you to focus on pushing back—whether farther, harder, or faster. For the vast majority of swimmers these actions create far more turbulence than propulsion. They also make you tired because they put the workload on?using arm and shoulder muscles, rather than tapping core power.

Fact 1: The most important contribution of the hand and arm is to reduce drag. To accomplish this, focus on using your arms to extend your bodyline and separate the molecules in front of you, rather than on pushing on the molecules behind you. This reduces wave drag–the most significant limiter of Stroke Length and speed.

Fact 2: When focused on?propulsion, use your hand to hold your place, instead of to push water back. The world’s best swimmers move the body past the hand. (In fact when Doc Counsilman filmed Mark Spitz in 1968, he was astonished to see that Spitz’s hand exited the water ahead of where it went in.) They can do this because they (i) excel at ‘active streamlining;’ and (ii) apply pressure with great precision–but surprisingly little force–as shown by a study of 1992 Olympic swimmers.

Myth: Kick to keep your legs from sinking. Kick even more to swim faster. Because of our survival instinct to churn the arms and legs, we need little encouragement to overdo this. Nonetheless we hear advice from all sides to kick more and harder. From the swim instructor who hands us a kickboard at our first lesson, to coaches who believe no workout is complete without a set devoted to pushing a kickboard up and down the pool, there’s a universal mania for kicking.

Fact: The legs are awesome at burning energy and creating drag, but almost pathetic at creating propulsion. Doc Counsilman (again) studied the effects of kicking among elite swimmers in the 1960s and found that kicking increased drag, and contributed nothing to propulsion at?speeds above 5 feet per second—a thoroughly pedestrian pace for top swimmers. Like the arms, your legs make their greatest contribution by?drafting behind the upper torso. Unless your goal is to sprint a short distance, you can hardly go wrong by kicking less. You’ll not only reduce drag and save energy. You also allow your legs to be drive more by core-body action than by fatigue-prone thigh muscles.10 Rear Streamline LH to RF

Myth: Stroke faster to swim faster. Like each of these myths, I subscribed to this as a young swimmer and it took me more than a decade—from age 38 to about 50–to fully undo the habit. We churn the arms from our first lap. Instinct also seems to suggest that the ‘obvious’ way to swim faster is to stroke faster. Then there are seemingly authoritative voices who tell us that top triathletes or open water swimmers stroke 70 or more times per minute and therefore we should too.

Fact: Swimming speed is determined by a simple equation: Stroke Length times Stroke Rate equals Velocity (SL x SR = V). You need both to swim faster but SL has conclusively been shown to be the foundation–the measure that correlates most strongly with performance.

To swim faster, first establish your optimal SL (measured by strokes per length or SPL and indexed to your height). Reducing drag is the easiest way to do so. Then incrementally increase SR, while maintaining an efficient SL.

The most precise and controllable way is by using a Tempo Trainer, increasing tempo by as little as one-hundredth of a second to ease adaptation. Increase tempo a tiny bit; maintain your stroke count. When that feels natural and easy, make another tiny tempo increase. Before long the cumulative increase in speed—with a long, relaxed, efficient stroke—will be quite significant. And sustainable.

Be Mindful . . .

As each of these stroke thoughts/skills are counter-intuitive, remember that habit, instinct—and most influences you encounter—will pull you back toward wasteful actions. Making these changes permanent requires conscious, purposeful, and mindful practice.

Find more tips like this in the Ultra-Efficient Freestyle Handbook, a richly-illustrated, easy-to-read 140 page guide to understanding freestyle technique in depth. It comes, along with 15 downloadable videos and a learning and practice workbook in our Self-Coaching Toolkit.toolkit.jpg

The post The Truth about Five Common Swimming Myths appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
/50c/archives/2665/feed/ 11
Swimming Principle #2: Most of what we “know” about swimming is wrong!- www.onew88.com /50c/archives/2639/ /50c/archives/2639/#comments Mon, 17 Aug 2015 11:36:44 +0000 /50c/?p=2639 Swimming Principle #1 is Always focus on saving energy before spending it. This is because a primal instinct for self-preservation transforms us into Energy Wasting Machines in the water. This was confirmed by a DARPA study in 2005 in which experienced lap swimmers wasted 97 percent of energy. Why should long-time swimmers convert only three […]

The post Swimming Principle #2: Most of what we “know” about swimming is wrong! appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
Swimming Principle #1 is Always focus on saving energy before spending it. This is because a primal instinct for self-preservation transforms us into Energy Wasting Machines in the water.

This was confirmed by a DARPA study in 2005 in which experienced lap swimmers wasted 97 percent of energy. Why should long-time swimmers convert only three percent of energy into forward motion? First, because our initial swimming experience is usually a ‘near-death experience;’ and second, because formal swim lessons and widespread ideas about training reinforce our instinctive reactions to the vulnerability and exhaustion we feel as beginners.

Our story begins about 6,000 years ago.

Terrestrial Technique

The oldest visual record of human swimming are wall drawings from Assyria, clay plates from Egypt, and bas-reliefs from Babylon, created between 2000 and 4000 B.C.. All show human figures swimming with head high and arms paddling, as in the bas-relief below.

 

Ancient swimming

These ancient depictions are remarkably similar to a?photograph of John Lennon from the 1970s.

Lennon Swimming

And Lennon’s form exactly matches the earliest visual record of my swimming—a brief home movie clip of me taken in a small bungalow-colony pool around 1961. It also matches the style of countless beginners you have likely seen?over the years . . . and most likely?your very own first lap!

A style that has persisted from the dawn of civilization to today and is universal is obviously embedded in our DNA. Its two common characteristics are:

? Head high to avoid choking.

? All four limbs churning to avoid sinking.

Lila head up body down for ps

I call this terrestrial technique, because it’s so similar to how dogs, deer, and other terrestrial mammals swim, after millions of years of adapting to life on land.

Because we feel that our very survival is at stake, our first attempts at swimming leave an imprint so deep in our psyches that it remains with us for life: Survival depends on churning your arms and legs.

For a fortunate few–after many exhausting, uncomfortable laps–staying alive concerns gradually give way to swimming farther ambitions. But the actions you perceive as having kept you alive—pulling and kicking—have taken hold in your brain as ‘essential swimming actions.’ And the fact that this style leaves you so exhausted inclines you to believe that great fitness is the key to progress.

If you observe experienced swimmers working out, seek guidance from a magazine or website, take lessons, or join a workout group, everything you see or hear seems to confirm your existing instincts about technique and training.

In psychology, this is known as the Bandwagon Effect–the tendency to do (or believe) things because you observe many others doing so.

?How Swim Instruction Evolved

Besides the fact that terrestrial swimming is instinctive, the Red Cross and similar bodies around the world?that have become the most-common source for?swim instruction originated as safety organizations, focused on drowning prevention. They accomplish this?by teaching terrestrial technique—how to pull and kick.

Since most drownings occur within a few meters?of safety their instruction never emphasized efficiency. Teaching swimmers to be water-safe . . . not graceful, efficient and tireless . . . remained their priority.

Consequently those of us who have had traditional swim instruction ?come away from it inclined to focus on pulling and kicking and (unless you learned about Total Immersion) and lacking even basic awareness of the importance of?Balance and Streamlining.

How Swim Training Evolved

Because swimming was so tiring–far more exhausting for a novice than running–it was natural to think of it as an endurance activity. When coach-directed swim training?emerged in the 1920s, it?emulated mileage-oriented approaches common in running. Training sessions prescribed swimming as far as time allowed and as hard as energy allowed. [Acccording to Dr. Michael Joyner of the Mayo Clinic, prior to the 1960s, emphasis on technique as a critical part of training?was considerably greater than it is today.]

With each decade times improved, seeming to confirm the efficacy of endurance-building approaches. In the 1960s, sports science became a recognized field. Physiologists conducted studies measuring how the muscles and cardiovascular system responded to work. This research was conducted on running treadmills and cycling ergometers–but not in pools, where data collection was difficult.

In the 1970s, swimming coaches, seeking more sophisticated training methods, began to adopt the conditioning formulas that resulted. More demanding and systematic training caused swimming records to fall at a faster pace. Books such as Doc Counsilman’s The Science of Swimming and Ernie Maglischo’s Swimming Faster became bibles of the swim coaching community. These books devoted hundreds of pages to explaining how the muscles metabolize energy. [They also examined technique, focusing almost exclusively on how to pull and kick.]

But while the results of the research on which these theories were based correlated somewhat?with performances in running, cycling, and cross-country skiing, this was never true for swimming:?The world record holder quite often had middling physiology, while middling swimmers had world-class physiology. Even so, in the pattern typical where instinct meets the Bandwagon effect a belief that training based primarily on how far and how hard is the path to faster times became universally embraced and seldom questioned.

Do Traditional Approaches Work?

Though most people have had poor experiences and outcomes from traditional approaches, when they don’t work for us, we tend to assume something’s wrong with us, rather than with?the instruction or training we were given. Yet in?looking at swimming through a wider lens, it seems clear?that these methods have significant?flaws.

? For beginning swimmers—both children and adults–a good outcome of traditional lessons is that while your drowning risk is diminished, your prospects of swimming a mile effortlessly seem hopelessly far off. And it’s rare to develop great enthusiasm—much less passion—for swimming.

? In competitive swimming, while rare exceptions like Katie Ledecky and Ryan Lochte have thrived on the hard work, the majority of young swimmers fall victim to injury?and burnout. Few of those who swam competitively in their youth can conceive of swimming as pleasurable or rewarding later in life.

? Lap and fitness swimmers continue for years without making any improvement in form or efficiency. Indeed it never occurs to most that they could be swimming much better.

? On triathlon forums, the two most frequent questions about swimming are: “How do I deal with the boredom?” and “How can I get faster?”

Follow the Principles

The combination of our primal instincts to swim in ways that lead to massive energy waste and the likelihood that most of what you see and hear will reinforce those tendencies in unhelpful ways is why we say it’s critical to be deeply?discerning about what you see or hear about about swimming. If something’s not working, look for a different way. ?And most important, make sure your “mental map” for swimming is based on sound and well-substantiated evidence.

Look to the First Principles for foundational ideas about how swimming ‘works,’ and to the Core Principles for guidance on how to practice.

Our downloadable?Ultra-Efficient Freestyle Self-Coaching Toolkit?teaches a principle-based learning method.?The drills and skills are illustrated in 15 short videos. Guidance on how to learn and practice each drill effectively is provided in the companion Workbook.7qiHwB77B6CDIzI5-uN1fY89mHl8_GMzsWYMMoRPcEg22vVsv8iayrgsJdagiJnLneZp0PLZNcLYMc4DXgKNhw=s0 5.14.19 PM

 

 

 

 

 

The post Swimming Principle #2: Most of what we “know” about swimming is wrong! appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
/50c/archives/2639/feed/ 15
Swimming Principle #1: Always save energy before spending it.- www.onew88.com /50c/archives/2618/ /50c/archives/2618/#comments Fri, 07 Aug 2015 18:04:51 +0000 /50c/?p=2618 At the Beijing Olympics in 2008, Stany Kempompo Ngangola gained a measure of fame for swimming the 100-meter freestyle. Not for his speed, but simply for surviving. Stany was among a small group of athletes—mostly from small underdeveloped nations–who are invited to the Olympics in hopes that the exposure will encourage sports development in their […]

The post Swimming Principle #1: Always save energy before spending it. appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
At the Beijing Olympics in 2008, Stany Kempompo Ngangola gained a measure of fame for swimming the 100-meter freestyle.

Not for his speed, but simply for surviving.

Stany was among a small group of athletes—mostly from small underdeveloped nations–who are invited to the Olympics in hopes that the exposure will encourage sports development in their homeland. These athletes are exempted from Olympic qualifying times.

Stany was selected for this honor a year in advance and given assistance with preparation by coaches from advanced swimming nations. Unfortunately the training he was given focused mostly on conditioning with little attention to technique.

Swimming in the first heat, Stany relied on youth and strength to get through his first 50-meter length, but hadn’t gone far on the second length before the commentators began to express concern—shared by everyone watching–about whether he could make it safely to the far wall.

Here’s a picture of Stany—looking very athletic—in the air.

Beijing Olympics Swimming Mens 50 Freestyle

 

And here is Stany in the water, struggling to complete 100 meters.

Beijing Olympics Swimming Mens 50 Freestyle

 

What’s remarkable about Stany is how utterly?unremarkable he is. I estimate that 95 percent of the millions who watched his struggles on TV would fare no better if put in that position themselves. You see, swimming, as an aquatic skill, is an ‘alien’ activity for land-adapted humans. Do you recognize the swimmer below?

Lennon Swimming

John Lennon — Human Swimmer!

 

Energy Wasting Machines

That’s why we say that it’s critical to recognize that—as inheritors of millions of years of adapting to life on terra firma—it is simply human nature to be an ‘energy-wasting machine’ in the water.

Lila head up body down for ps

This was confirmed by a study done by DARPA in 2005 while designing a swim foil for the Navy Seals. They found that dolphins convert 80 percent of energy into forward motion. The humans they studied (lap and fitness swimmers—people who thought they swam ‘okay’) were only 3 percent energy efficient.

This bring us to Swimming Principle #1: Always focus on saving energy before increasing fitness.?

To apply this principle, do the following:

? When developing technique, master Vessel-Shaping skills (Balance, Core Stability, Alignment, and Streamlining, before propulsion skills (pulling and kicking.) Vessel-Shaping skills take little energy to perform and provide significant payback in energy savings. Propulsion skills require much more energy and power to perform.

? Propulsion A: When you focus on your pull and kick, pay attention first to how you use the arms and legs to minimize drag, before focusing on how you apply pressure to the water.

?? Job One for your arms is to lengthen your bodyline, since that reduces wave drag.

?? Job One for your legs is to draft behind your upper body—not to churn the water into a froth.

Slot to Skate  45 Add combine text

? Propulsion B: Strive to replace forces generated by your muscles with ‘available’ forces from nature—gravity and buoyancy.

? Swim farther by learning to swim a shorter distance almost effortlessly—rather than pushing to add another length.

? Swim faster by learning to swim at your current speed as easily as possible. Faster times will then come as a matter of course.

? Indeed, for any swimming set, task, or challenge, always start out with the intention to find the easiest possible way to complete it—rather than testing your ability to push through fatigue or discomfort.

Learn energy-saving techniques with our downloadable?Ultra-Efficient Freestyle Self-Coaching Toolkit. The drills and skills are illustrated in 15 short videos. Guidance on how to learn and practice each drill effectively is provided in the companion Workbook.toolkit.jpg

The post บาคาร่า สูตร appeared first on Swim For Life.

]]>
/50c/archives/2618/feed/ 20
บาคาร่า สูตร sitemap W88.com bet365 soccer bet365soccer sbobet 5555 scr888onlinecasino sbobetca 12betslot